People who eat at least six portions of fruit and vegetables a day are less stressed

Feeling stressed? Grab a salad! People who eat at least six portions of fruit and vegetables a day are less tense than those who shun their greens, study reveals

Researchers examined 8,600 adults aged 25 to 91 about greens and stressThey found eating more fruit and vegetables resulted in 10 per cent less stressThis applied to those consuming at least 470g per day, that is about six portionsAuthors say this could be due to them getting more key nutrients in their diet 

Eating at least six portions of fruit and vegetables every day can reduce your stress levels and makes you less tense than those who avoid their greens, study shows.

Researchers from Australia’s Edith Cowan University examined the link between fruit and vegetable intake and stress levels of more than 8,600 people aged 25 to 91. 

They found that those who consume at least 470g of fruit and vegetables every day had 10 per cent lower stress levels than those who consumed under 230g.

According to the NHS an average adult portion of fruit or vegetables is 80g, so the study found you’d need about six daily portions to reduce stress. 

The team say the mechanism that links fruit and veg to stress is unclear, but could be due to those consuming more getting higher doses of key nutrients in their diet.  

Eating at least six portions of fruit and vegetables every day can reduce your stress levels and makes you less tense than those who avoid their greens, study shows. Stock image

WHAT IS STRESS? 

Stress is the body’s reaction to feeling threatened or under pressure. 

It’s very common, can be motivating to help us achieve things in our daily life, and can help us meet the demands of home, work and family life.

But too much stress can affect our mood, our body and our relationships – especially when it feels out of our control. 

It can make us feel anxious and irritable, and affect our self-esteem.

Experiencing a lot of stress over a long period of time can also lead to a feeling of physical, mental and emotional exhaustion.

SOURCE: NHS 

Lead researcher, PhD candidate Simone Radavelli-Bagatini said the study strengthens the link between diets rich in fruit and vegetables and mental wellbeing.

‘We found that people who have higher fruit and veggie intakes are less stressed than those with lower intakes, which suggests diet plays a key role in mental wellbeing,’ said Ms Radavelli-Bagatini. 

Mental health is an increasing problem around the world, with one in four in the UK experience a mental health problem of some kind each year.

Globally, approximately 1 in 10 people live with a mental health disorder of some kind, according to the authors of this new study. 

Ms Radavelli-Bagatini said that some stress is considered normal, but long-term exposure can significantly impact mental health.

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